Thursday, 9 August 2012

The Coronation of King Edward VII 9 August 1902


HM King Edward VII, 1902
[From my own collection]

The 9th of August 2012 marks the 110th anniversary of the Coronation of King Edward VII, "By the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas King, Defender of the Faith, Emperor of India" and also of his wife Queen Alexandra, "Queen Consort of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions; Empress Consort of India".


HM Queen Alexandra, 1902
[From my own collection]

I thought this would be an opportune time to share some of my royal memorabilia specifically relating to King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra. Interspersed with these images are quotes which detail something of the King and how he was viewed as a Monarch and the valuable contribution he made but also a couple of interesting references to his valued consort, Queen Alexandra.


Service sheet for the Coronation Day
service in Dalserf Parish Church
Lanarkshire Scotland, 9th Aug 1902.
The original date has been blocked out.
[From my own collection]

The Coronation had in fact been delayed from the 26th June 1902 due to Edward's operation for appendicitis. This caused many problems for manufacturers of souvenir china who had already manufactured and printed their wares carrying the now incorrect date of the 26th June.


A Staffordshire wall plaque commemorating the Coronation. The
 original date has been carefully painted out with gold paint.
[From my own collection]

"As King, Edward VII proved a greater success than anyone had expected, but he was already an old man and had little time left to fulfil the role. In his short reign, he ensured that his second son and heir, George V, was better prepared to take the throne."


A Royal Doulton bone china cup and saucer bearing effigies of both King
Edward VII and Queen Alexandra. The saucer is marked "Coronation 1902"
[From my own collection]

"He had a tremendous zest for pleasure but he also had a real sense of duty" [JB Priestley]


The reverse of the above Royal Doulton duo.

"In 1875, Edward set off for India on an extensive eight-month tour of the sub-continent. His advisors remarked on his habit of treating all people the same, regardless of their social station or colour."


A gilt medal struck by Elkington and Co Ltd in
1902 to commemorate the Coronation of King
Edward VII and Queen Alexandra. It came with
an attractive red Moroccan leather and velvet box.
[From my own collection]

"Biographers have asserted that Alexandra was denied access to the King's briefing papers and excluded from some of his foreign tours to prevent her meddling in diplomatic matters. In 1890 Alexandra wrote a memorandum, distributed to senior British ministers and military personnel, warning against the planned exchange of the British North Sea island of Heligoland for the German colony of Zanzibar, pointing out Heligoland's strategic significance and that it could be used either by Germany to launch an attack, or by Britain to contain German aggression."


A Royal Doulton bone china beaker bearing an effigy of
His Majesty King Edward VII.
On the reverse are a Crown, Edward's Cypher, and the words
"Coronation 1902".
[From my own collection]

"[The King] ordered all the clocks at Sandringham to run half an hour fast to create more time for shooting. This so-called tradition of Sandringham Time continued until 1936"


A Foley Bone China mug, again with the incorrect date.
[From my own collection] 

"[The King] was regarded worldwide as an arbiter of men's fashions. He made wearing tweed, Homburg hats and Norfolk jackets fashionable, and popularised the wearing of black ties with dinner jackets, instead of white tie and tails"


A wall plaque given by Ambrose Edmund Butler J.P., The Lord Mayor
 of Leeds, to the 80,000 children of the City of Leeds. It was made for the
retail firm of JH Awmack, Leeds and bears the previous coronation date.
[From my own collection]

"Alexandra did not attend her son's coronation in 1911 since it was not customary for a crowned Queen to attend the coronation of another King or Queen, but otherwise continued the public side of her life, devoting time to her charitable causes [such as] Alexandra Rose Day"


One side of a stereoscopic photo of HM King Edward VII with his
Grandchildren taken at Balmoral Castle in Scotland a few weeks after
the Coronation in 1902. The children are (L to R) HRH Prince Edward,
Prince Henry, Princess Victoria, and HRH Prince George.
[From my own collection]

"Usually, Edward's outbursts of temper were short-lived, and "after he had let himself go ... [he would] smooth matters by being especially nice"


A Foley bone china enamelled cup and saucer, again with the
incorrect date.
[From my own collection]

"To lose our eldest son [Prince Albert Victor in 1892], is one of those calamities one can never really get over"... and the King also writing to Queen Victoria, "[I would] have given my life for him, as I put no value on mine". Queen Alexandra wrote, "I have buried my angel and with him my happiness."


The reverse of the above Foley bone china duo.
[From my own collection]

"[Queen Alexandra's] generosity was a source of embarrassment to her financial advisers. Whenever she received a letter soliciting money, a cheque would be sent by the next post, regardless of the authenticity of the mendicant and without having the case investigated." Though she was not always extravagant [she had her old stockings darned for re-use and her old dresses were recycled as furniture covers], she would dismiss protests about her heavy spending with a wave of a hand or by claiming that she had not heard."


A "Coronation" 22 carat gold £5 Sovereign minted by the Royal
Mint to commemorate the Coronation in 1902.
The Sovereign's Head appears on the reverse.
[From my own collection] 

"William the Great [speaking of his militaristic Nephew Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany] needs to learn that he is living at the end of the nineteenth century and not in the Middle Ages."


Aluminium Medal presented, I believe, to children
who were attending School in Scotland in 1902. This
medal features in my previous Blog,
"In Defense of Scotland's National Rights and Honour"
[From my own collection] 

"Edward's affability and popularity, as well as his use of family connections, assisted Britain [during his reign] in building European alliances".


The commemorative card presented by the Governor of New Zealand to all
children attending Schools in New Zealand at the time of the Coronation.
This particular card was presented to my Uncle who was attending the
small country school of Heddon Bush in rural Southland.
[From my own collection]

"Edward was rarely interested in politics, although his views on some issues were notably liberal for the time... On other matters he was less progressive: he did not, for example, favour giving votes to women... He was also opposed to Irish Home Rule, instead preferring a form of dual monarchy."


King Edward VII, 1902.
An oil painting by Luke Fildes in the
National Portrait Gallery, London.
[Source : Wikipedia]

Bibliography :

- Wikipedia
- Unless otherwise stated all images are from my own collection but may be freely copied for non-commercial purposes provided a link is given back to this page.


17 comments:

  1. Im sure you meant to caption the picture of King Edward VII and his grandchildren as thats him with the future Edward VIII,Duke of Windsor, Duke of Gloucester, Mary, Princess Royal and Albert Duke of York/King George VI.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh thank you Marion, how embarrassing! Apart from my error the names are those printed on the back of the photo. Thanks again.

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  2. Cool.. I love the Victorian era. It is interesting that Edward was rarely interested in politics. Firstly he had waited for the throne for so long, he may have lost interest in anything but surviving middle age with no clear purpose in life. But it is also possible that the monarchy was becoming less and less involved in politics, and more becoming the head of state for the entire population.

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    Replies
    1. Yes, Edward does appear to be somewhat of a paradox. Once he became King he seems to have primarily 'held' Europe together by using his extended family connections and attempting to keep them all in line. But had he lived longer I think events would have eventually overwhelmed even him.

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  3. Ihave a set of 6 cups and saucers with the corect August date, what is an approximate value please.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm sorry, I couldn't even hazard a guess and an awful lot depends on the condition of the item, visual appeal, the manufacturer, and the quality of the item but if there is even the slightest damage or wear that can drastically affect the value. And the rarity of an item often trumps quantity. If you are considering selling privately you could always test the market first with a higher reserve and no "buy now" option but you also have the hassle of insurance against breakage in transit. But remember that if you are considering selling at an antique and collectables auction prices generally reflect the current market whereas you would normally expect a lower (often much lower!) price from a dealer, even after paying the auction fee.

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  4. Hello, Would you have any idea if there's a market for an original programme of Edward VII's visit on July 3, 1909, to Rugby School to open the Speech Room? It's about 40 pages, with many photographs, in excellent condition, and includes a colourful commemorative ribbon with an image of the royal couple. Many thanks for your help.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm probably not the most qualified person to ask but there always seems to be interest in Royal memorabilia - but at very varying prices. Probably not a valuable item but excellent condition and the ribbon etc would definitely add extra interest as a combined auction lot (few ribbons will have survived). Putting it into an on-line auction with a reserve should enable you to test the market.

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  5. Good afternoon I've got a brass 1902 Edward and Alexandra what to me looks like a tea pot stand and its got Reg on back and also a pat number on there too I've never seen on before and can't find anything like this to put against its quite interesting I could send a picture I just do not know what it is really or if authentic it was found in a old house I was clearing any info would be help full thank you

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    Replies
    1. Hi, How interesting. I've never heard of a commemorative tea pot stand either but I suppose why not when there were commemorative tea cups, tea pots and teaspoons? I would love to see a photo : em66nz@hotmail.com

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  6. does any1 know of any queen alexadra and king Edward vii either bone china shoes or boots painted off eack person sep marked 1785a
    if so pls email me asap as im looking to buy them but don't know there worth.
    thx mike
    my email is
    mgrammenis@cogeco.ca

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  7. Hello believe that Edward V11, due to his friendship with a Mrs Hartmann nee Steiner, came to visit Accrington, Lancashire. We have a house where allegedly he may have stayed, known as Colney HOuse. Do you know if any important person, possibly a Duke with this name, could have attended the coronation? Am trying to find out why the house was so named. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would write to the Royal Archives at Windsor Castle. I have found them to be exceedingly helpful and interested in obscure enquiries (plus there was no research charge). It would just be a case of looking at the invitation / guest list which i'm sure they will have. Good luck in your search.

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  8. I have the coronation cup and saucer with the correct date with the Reg design number 384710 on the cup but not the saucer. Is this correct? How rare is the correct date? Alan

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    Replies
    1. I'm sorry Alan, all my collection is packed away now and stored so cannot check the Reg. design details. Perhaps a knowledgeable reader could answer this question.

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  9. Hi Don -- love your "blog" and site V useful insights -- We live in Coronation House in Brinscall Lancashire built as a small Cottage / Isolation Hospital in 1902 by the local Industrialist W Parkes - It is actually called Coronation Celebration Hospital and was built solely at the expense of Mr Parkes to "celebrate the Coronation of Prince Edward" We had a party in the house in August 2002 to celebrate its 100 birthday !! I have built up a small collection of items relating to the Coronation -including a baton used on the occasion Kind Regards David Metcalfe

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  10. Thanks for your comment David. It's fun to have a focus for collecting and makes exploring collectable shops more interesting looking for that illusive souvenir commemorating the coronation - especially when it has added significance to the age of your home. My latest purchase in February this year was a lovely 3 piece Doulton Burslem 1902 commemorative teaset, have never seen anything like it before. Kind regards, Don

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